Income statements can surprise investors

[updates: 3/18/2016, 3/28/16 addition of the ‘customer-derived profit’ concept of EBIT]

No other report of profit exerts greater influence on the Stock Market than that of a company’s net income. Why? Stock analysts make predictions of future net income that influence the decisions of investors.  Eventual announcements of actual net income may be very pleasing or disappointing news to investors who then generate a surge of trading in the market place.

The company’s only sources of income are customers, investments, and investors.  For an established company, customers are the preferred source of profit!  Operating income (a.k.a. EBIT) is the profit earned from customers.  The adjustment of EBIT by extra items yields net income.  Net income (a.k.a. Earnings, EPS) represents the profit that a company can share with its stock holders. Market regulators require companies to reveal the operating income and net income in quarterly and annual income statements.

Income statements are designed to reveal how business operations generate net income. The purpose of this article is to describe the income statement of companies outside the banking and insurance industries. Hopefully this article will help you perform a fundamental analysis of most companies listed in the stock market.

Structure

The Income Statement is one of 3 financial statements that companies report to investors on a quarterly and annual basis. Accountants prepare the statement by consolidating all of the company’s non-cash transactions into a standardized ledger that measures the business operations used to earn a profit. Chart 1 shows the main elements of an income statement:

incomestatement

Chart 1

Total Revenues are also called the top line of the income statement. They measure the net sales of all products. Operating expenses are used to acquire, sell, and distribute the products. Extra items are additional transactions that don’t generate sales, but increase or reduce the profit from sales. Net income is also called the bottom line of the company. Net income is the profit that a company can share with its stock holders.

Relevant information

In my opinion, the “LINE ITEM” column in Table 1 lists the income statement’s most relevant information for individual investors. The “$” column shows the relevant measurement in units of U.S. dollars. The “% OF SALES” and “PROFIT MARGIN” columns display convenient ways of analyzing the income statement. At the time of this writing, I collected the “$” and “% OF SALES” data from a company’s ‘financials’ tab in morningstar.com. I simply toggled the statement’s ‘view’ command to switch from $ to %.

mainitems

Table 1.

“Revenue” (a.k.a. Total revenues, Sales) is the total value of all products shipped to customers during the reporting period. The revenue is usually recorded at the time of delivery before any cash payment is made by the customer. “Gross profit” is the remaining revenue after deducting all costs of production from the Sales. “Operating income” is the remaining revenue after deducting all other expenses of operating the business from the gross profit. “Income before taxes” is the remaining revenue after adjusting the operating income available to pay taxes. Net income is the company’s earnings after the revenue is reduced by all operating expenses and extra items.

There are several line items of net income listed in every income statement.

  • “Net income available to common shareholders” represents the residual net income after payments of dividends to the company’s preferred shareholders.
  • “Diluted Earnings per share” (EPS) is the portion of “net income income available to common shareholders” divided by diluted shares. Diluted shares are all outstanding shares (“basic shares”) plus the potential gain of shares from convertible securities.

Fundamental analysis of profitability

Profit margins are percentages of Revenue that represent intermediate and final profits. The profit margins in Table 1 measure the impact of production, operating expenses, and extra items on the company’s sales. Here are the units of measurement:

  • Gross margin = 100 * Gross profit / Revenue = 41.3% = 43.1 cents of every sales dollar.
  • Operating margin = 100 * Operating income / Revenue = 22.4 % = 22.4 cents of every sales dollar.
  • Net margin = 100 * Net income / Revenue = 14.2% = 14.2 cents of every sales dollar.

In table 1, the gross margin reveals that after paying all costs of production, the company is left with 43.1 cents from every dollar of revenue to pay for the remaining operating expenses. Costs of production include all expenses of manufacturing goods and providing services. The manufacturing process requires equipment, labor, and basic materials to build an inventory of finished goods. The provision of services requires labor and equipment. A company can be more profitable by reducing its costs of production.

The operating margin (Table 1) represents a residual revenue of 22.4 cents per sales dollar after paying all costs of production plus the costs of maintaining the business and selling the product. Think of the operating margin as customer-derived profit.  A company can earn more profit from its customers by cutting some of its operating expenses.

Net income is the remaining profit after paying operating expenses and adjusting for extra items such as government taxes. In table 1, the net margin is 14.2 cents for every dollar of revenue. The company could be more profitable by cutting some of its expenses or earning extra income. The net income is available to reward share holders in a variety of ways that eventually translate into capital gains and possibly dividends. For example, the earnings per share (a derivative of the net income) enables thousands of stock market participants to place a value on each share of ownership in the company. An increase in market value would allow stockholders to sell their shares for a capital gain.

Fundamental analysis of the competition

The business performance of 2 or more companies in the same industry can be compared by assessing their profit margins. Table 2 provides an hypothetical example of how 2 competitors manage their business revenue. For every sales dollar, company A is less profitable than company B as revealed by A’s lower profit margins. Why is B more profitable? Its 66% gross margin reflects a lower cost of production that ultimately generates a higher net margin of 24%. Game over!

Table 2.

Table 2.

Notice that company A is more efficient at maintaining its business and selling its product. Company A’s 19 percentage-point difference between 41% and 22% is less than company B’s 33 percentage-point difference between 66% and 33%. For every dollar of sales, Company A was better at squeezing some profit from its customers with lower maintenance and sales costs. Also notice that the impact of extra items (e.g. potential taxes) was nearly the same for both companies; 8 percentage-point versus 9 percentage-point differences between the operating and net margins.

Conclusions

Income statements report a set of measurements that investors can use to analyze a company’s business operations and its ability to earn a profit. The company’s operating income (‘EBIT’) and net income (‘EPS’) are the key elements of an income statement.  Operating income is used to calculate the operating margin, which measures how much profit the company earns out of every sales dollar from its customers.  The net income  depends on total revenue and efficient management.  For every dollar of revenue, the company that operates more efficiently has a better chance of earning a net income as measured in separate ways by the net margin and EPS.  The company’s earnings per share (EPS) represent the profit that the company can share with its stock holders. There are several ways to increase the EPS: boost sales, trim costs, retrieve shares, and seek extra income.

Copyright © 2016 Douglas R. Knight

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: